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Ethanol Vinasse improves health of pigs. Young animals benefit the most from vinasse addition to the feed, since their immunological system has not yet fully developed. In suckling piglets (1 to 33 days of age), vinasse may be offered successfully in two ways: 5 ml of vinasse/piglet at the third day of age orally in one dosage or 1% of vinasse in the feeds daily from 14 days of age. A gain increase of 32 g per day was achieved resulting in a 1.02 kg increase in live weight at weaning. Another aspect reported was the improved uniformity of the litter weight that is higher than 85%. In growing pigs (33 to 89 days of age), 10 ml of vinasse/animal/day may be offered mixed with the daily ration during the first three weeks. With this inclusion level, the live weight increased with 4.4 kg, mortality is reduced with more than 20% and incidence of diarrhoea is reduced by 26%. In pig fattening, an intake of 0.5 kg/animal/day is achieved in pigs from 20 to 50 kg when it is supplied over the traditional feeds. In the stage from 50 to 100 kg of live weight, the maximum intake of vinasse is 1 kg/animal/day. Pregnant sows consume up to 1 kg of vinasse/day, giving to the sow 32.28 g of crude protein, 1.34 g of calcium, 0.5 g of phosphorous and 185 g of iron, apart from the not -quantified amounts of hydro-soluble vitamins, minerals and walls of yeasts with shown probiotic effects.   Feb 6, 2015Hal Debor
Very helpful information on the potential of Vinasse.   Feb 12, 2015Adham yusupov
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The 2015 SSA Conference in Orlando which was just held was well attended and excellent papers were presented. There was a shift in technology away from ethanol to syrup from sweet sorghum for the production of alcohol. EPEC Holding presented samples of their commercial premium alcohol which they named James F.C. Hyde after the man who brought sweet sorghum to the USA in the about 1850. The University of Florida presented information on new SS hybrids which exhibit larger yields. There were 2 presentations from Brazil of the work that is being done there with SS. The Heckemeyers from Missouri presented their project installing a 2 tandem cane crushing system and their challenge in making syrup and fighting starch. There was a good presentation of juice extraction technology, diffuser vs. traditional roller mills. Randy Powell also talked about their experience with crushing SS with various designs of roller mills. All in all it was a great meeting and new and meaningful information about growing and processing sweet sorghum was presented. These papers will be posted on the website shortly. Hope to see you all at next years conference. Hal  Jan 29, 2015Hal Debor
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Sweet Sorghum vs. Castor oil for the production of bio-diesel Traditionally bio-diesel is produced from waste oils from the food industry such as deep frying oil from the fast food chains. Plant oils are also used such as soybean oil, palm oil, oil from jatropha and castor oil has also been proposed. The production of a synthetic bio-diesel from biomass is not too well known even though Alphakat from Germany ( www.alphakat.de ) has built commercial plants for the past 6 years. Bio-mass is mixed with lime and a proprietary catalyst and processed in a KDV plant to produce a synthetic bio-diesel within 3 minutes. In a recent study for a project in Ecuador we compare the production and economics of producing bio-diesel from either sweet sorghum using the Alphakat technology and castor oil using a conventional bio-diesel production plant. Bio-diesel from castor oil One hectare of Castor nuts with 2 harvests a year yields 3 mt/y of seeds which will produce 800 gallons of bio-diesel per year. Synthetic bio-diesel from sweet sorghum In Ecuador we yield an average of 100 mt/ha of green sweet sorghum (SS) biomass per crop cycle. The climate in Ecuador allows us to have three harvests/year and so we yield a total of 300 mt/y of green bio-mass at 85% moisture. The Alphakat system requires biomass at 20% moisture and then the biomass yield is 56 mt/y. The Alphakat process required 3,600 mt/y of biomass to produce 1,000,000 lit/y ( 265,000 gallons) of synthetic bio-diesel. Thus 56 mt/y will produce 4,120 gallons/year of synthetic bio-diesel. Conclusion One hectare of land in Ecuador will produce five times more synthetic bio-diesel than castor oil. If anyone is interested in developing a bio-diesel project using sweet sorghum or any other biomass please contact us. Greetings, Hal Debor Debor Consulting Cell: +1-514-812-7947 Web: www.deborconsulting.com   Oct 21, 2013Hal Debor
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The Proposed name may be “Sweet sorghum bioenergy producers and processors association” Regards S.S.Rao, PhD, ARS, FISPP Principal Scientist(Physiology) & PI(AICSIP-Phy.) [Visiting Scientist, Kansas State Univ.,USA] Directorate of Sorghum Research (DSR), Indian Council of Agric. Research(ICAR), Rajendranagar, Hyderabad-500030,(AP),India Tel:+91-40-24018651;Fax:+91-40-24016378 M:09849108123; Alt.E-mail:ssrao1959@gmail.com Web: www.sorghum.res.in   Jan 4, 2013S S Rao
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Exploring a new name for the association that expands the efforts to utilize sweet sorghum for other bioproducts beyond ethanol.  Aug 9, 2012Robert Ratliff
I have given some thought to this and come up with names Sweet Sorghum Bio-fuel Ass, names Sweet Sorghum Bio-Energy Ass, Sweet Sorghum Bio-Chemical Ass, Sweet Sorghum Bio-Fuel Ass and to me none of them represent what can be done with SS and here is why. 1. Whole Plant We are using the whole plant as follows: - We harvest it with a forage harvester, field dry it and make hay which is baled and used as animal food, - burn the hay in a bio-mass boiler to produce steam and electricity, - use the hay to make bio-diesel - used in a gasifier using Pyrolysis to produce a syn-gas which will produce - jet fuel - green gasoline - naphtha - used in a jet engine to produce electricity - Can use the stalk to make charcoal to be used as a cooking fuel 2. The Sugar Juice We use the sugar juice from the stalk to make the following products: - ferment it and make ethanol, wet or dry - ferment is to make potable alcohol for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries or to be blended into drinking alcohol for human consumption. - ferment it to produce n-butanol - treat it with bacteria to produce a liquid organic fertilizer. - use it as feedstock to produce bio-plastics - use it in the Green Yeast process to make Kluyveromyces Yeast for the animal feed supplement industry. - concentrate it to make syrup for the food & baking industry. - Produce an organic fertilizer from the press mud produced in the juice clarification process 3. The Bagasse - Use it directly from the roller presses in a bio-mass boiler to produce steam and electricity - Use it directly from the roller presses as animal food in the form of silage - As above for the whole plant make bio-diesel, all types of fuels etc. - Use it in the Pulp & Paper industry to make pulp as is done in China already. - Make briquettes to replace charcoal as a cooking fuel - make wood pellets for the pellet stove industry. 4. Co-products In many of the above process we produce co-products such as: - The vinasse from the ethanol process can yield: - organic fertilizer - Kluyveromyces Yeast - When producing potable alcohol we also get: - Technical alcohol - Fusil oil - The ash from a biomass boiler also has a number of uses which I have not yet explored. I know that it is used in the production of bricks. Considering all of these uses of SS I have not been able to coin a collective noun and a new association name which could be used by the Association to re-name itself and represent the true potential of Sweet Sorghum. The name change I could support would be “Sweet Sorghum Association” or leave the name as it is as it is well know now. Greetings, Hal   Oct 2, 2012Hal Debor
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Greetings from the Webmaster for the new website. Please explore the website and offer your comments regarding the features and funcution you like, as well any errors or ommisions that need attention. Please post your comments in this Discussion Forum or send an email message to RobertRatliff@ProfitableFarming.com  Aug 8, 2012Robert Ratliff
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ESSE Community Prel Sweet Sorghum Manual -- The link below is for the Preliminary Sweet Sorghum Manual just published by the ESSE-Community in Europe. It contains valuable information. (http://esse-community.eu/wp-content/uploads/2011/02/Sweethanol-Early-manual2.pdf) For your information Hal  Mar 15, 2011Hal Debor
In the next months in our ESSE Community we have planned to publish different manuals about the bioethanol production starting from sweet sorghum biomass, each one characterize by a specific topics. If you are interested on it, do not hesitate to check our website daily; we are going to insert more news, more articles and we are waiting for your contribution in our topics of discussion in order to improve our EU model (as well the USA model), as presented in the Sweethanol Early Manual. And if you want and you have pleasure on it, please, join to our Community! http://esse-community.eu   Mar 31, 2011Hal Debor
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Debor Letter of Resignation. Dear Members of SSEA. It was a pleasure meeting with those of you who attended the recent Annual Meting of SSEA in Orlando and I need to inform you that I have made the decision to resign as President of the Association for personal reasons. I wish you all success in your projects and hopefully all of the legislative obstacles in the road in the US will be removed soon to allow you to join the bio-fuel revolution using sweet sorghum. The By-Laws of SSEA require that the newly elected VP, Scott Gibson, takes on the responsibilities of the President. Please direct all your question regarding SSEA business to him or any Board member. It was a pleasure to serve you the past four years and possibly our paths will cross in the world of bio-fuels. Greetings, Hal Debor  Feb 5, 2011Hal Debor
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The SSEA is please to announce that David Blume will the Key Note Speaker at this year's Annual Conference in Orlando, FL on January 27 - 28. David will address the Conference on Thursday evening after the Banquette.  Jan 26, 2011Hal Debor
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NSP Teams Up with Sweet Sorghum Ethanol Associatio 1 Year, 9 Months ago FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE November 11, 2010 NSP Teams Up with Sweet Sorghum Ethanol Association LUBBOCK, Texas – National Sorghum Producers and the Sweet Sorghum Ethanol Association (SSEA) are happy to announce a formal collaborative agreement between the two organizations. While NSP and SSEA have worked together in the past, the new collaborative agreement will allow both organizations to expand their efforts to develop and expand the sweet sorghum industry. With SSEA’s organizational support, NSP will hold a lead role for developing and implementing a legislative advocacy program. The two organizations will share communication among their memberships, and will explore opportunities and synergies in the future for joint conferences and other membership events. “Sweet sorghum has become an important segment of our industry,” said Gerald Simonsen, NSP chairman. “We are excited about the opportunities our collaboration with SSEA will create for sorghum as we continue our push for the inclusion of sweet sorghum in the Renewable Fuels Standard 2.” NSP is actively working with the EPA to certify sweet sorghum as an advanced biofuel feedstock in the petition process of the RFS 2. "We are very pleased to work collaboratively with NSP and are firmly committed to contribute all that we can to the effort to gain advanced biofuel designation for sweet sorghum,” said Hal Debor, SSEA president. "Elevating awareness of sweet sorghum's vast potential as a biofuel feedstock is a precondition to building a sweet sorghum ethanol industry," said Steve Vanechanos, chairman of EPEC Biofuels Holdings Inc., and chairman of SSEA's NSP Collaboration Committee. "By collaborating with NSP, we will be substantially increasing the decibel level of sweet sorghum advocacy". -30- Lindsay W. Kennedy National Sorghum Producers Director of External Affairs 4201 N. I-27 Lubbock, Texas 79403 (806) 687-8727 office (806) 224-5330 cell www.sorghumgrowers.com  Mar 15, 2011Hal Debor
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